‘He has left a legacy’ - Batley Bulldogs head coach pays tribute to Leeds Rhinos legend Rob Burrow

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Batley Bulldogs’ head coach Mark Moxon has described Rob Burrow as “one of a kind” after the Leeds Rhinos legend passed away last weekend.

The Headingley club announced on Sunday that Burrow had passed away peacefully at Pinderfields Hospital after being diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease (MND) in December 2019.

Praising Burrow’s on-field talents, as well as his family, Moxon said:

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“He was one of a kind. He had so much success, for his size, in a big man’s world. Every time he took to the field it was like David and Goliath but he had so much fight that everybody wanted to see him succeed and that’s what he did.

Batley Bulldogs’ head coach Mark Moxon has described Rob Burrow as “one of a kind” after the Leeds Rhinos legend passed away last weekend.Batley Bulldogs’ head coach Mark Moxon has described Rob Burrow as “one of a kind” after the Leeds Rhinos legend passed away last weekend.
Batley Bulldogs’ head coach Mark Moxon has described Rob Burrow as “one of a kind” after the Leeds Rhinos legend passed away last weekend.

“There weren’t many before him who have had the success and I don’t think there will be many after.

“He had the heart of a lion to be able to succeed. He was just so talented. He had the backing of all his team-mates, and, from the outpouring of goodwill, you can see there has been so much admiration for him in how he played the game and what he achieved.”

He added: “Being a family man myself, the way his family and the way Lindsey has done what she’s done throughout his struggle, I think has been immense. She has been a strength for everybody, to see how she’s managed.

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“As a family they have all dug together, his kids have been great. It makes your heart melt to see how they’ve coped, kept loving and pushed through it. It’s been awesome.”

Asked if the overwhelming outpouring of emotion towards Burrow and his family made him proud to be part of the rugby league family, Moxon replied:

“This is what rugby league is and it is what rugby league does. It makes you proud to be involved in rugby league. Rugby league makes you honest. There are lots of honest people in rugby league. And the Burrow family is a massive shining example of that.

“He has left a legacy. It makes us all appreciate what we have got and live for the moment because you never know what is around the corner. He has made a massive impression on everybody.”

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Batley Bulldogs have a weekend off as Wakefield Trinity and Sheffield Eagles, who were beaten 31-18 by Moxon’s side last weekend, face each other in the 1895 Cup final on Saturday (kick off 5.45pm) at Wembley, straight after the Challenge Cup final between Wigan Warriors and Warrington Wolves (kick off 3pm).

And the RFL have confirmed that there will be plans to honour Burrow at the three-game event, which also sees the women’s Challenge Cup final kick off at 11.45am.

In all three games there will be a minute’s applause in the seventh minute - Burrow, who won the Challenge Cup twice with Leeds at the national stadium, famously wore the club’s number 7 shirt.

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