Kirklees Council is on track to build 10,000 new homes by 2023

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Last month alone saw approval given to 600 homes, including a 67-home estate off Granny Lane, at Lower Hopton in Mirfield.

Deputy Leader of the Council, Coun Peter McBride, said “a significant number” of the homes being built were prefabricated units “that would minimise energy use”.

He added: “This shows how the council is bringing its power and influence to bear: to ensure that approvals turn into deliveries and to ensure that our social ambitions are realised in the execution of our planning.”

The council adopted its Local Plan last February.

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Kirklees Council is on track to build 10,000 new homesby 2023.Kirklees Council is on track to build 10,000 new homesby 2023.
Kirklees Council is on track to build 10,000 new homesby 2023. | other

An order from the government, it includes 31,000 homes, many of which will have to be built within the green belt, as there is insufficient non-green belt land in the borough.

It equates to building 1,730 homes per annum in the borough.

The council has committed to making at least 20% of the total number of homes affordable and to deliver extra care provision “throughout the borough”.

Among the land allocated for housing are 41 council-owned sites.

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Deputy Leader of the Council, CounPeter McBride.Deputy Leader of the Council, CounPeter McBride.
Deputy Leader of the Council, CounPeter McBride. | other

Outlining the latest stage of the housing delivery plan at a meeting of the council’s decision-making Cabinet, Clr McBride said: “The Local Plan approved 11 months ago gave us the approval and momentum to build 31,000 houses in the next 15 years.

“The report shows exactly what we have chosen for all of our major sites and gives us an update on success so far.

“The evidence is strong that the momentum of the plan and the delivery programme of the council are quickly coming to fruition.”

Furious residents who objected to the development said the land on which the houses would be built was an ancient floodplain, whilst Granny Lane itself is regularly floods from the nearby River Calder and via the flow down from the hills that can overwhelm underground culverts.