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Celebration of thanksgiving marks end of fasting

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Muslim families in Dewsbury, Mirfield, Batley, Heckmondwike and the Spen-Valley have celebrated the festival of Eid-Ul-Fitr, which marked the end of their holy month of fasting – Ramadhan.

The fasting has involved no eating or drinking during daylight hours for 30 consecutive days!

Lots of tasty Indian dishes help celebrate the end of EID-Ul-Fitr.

Lots of tasty Indian dishes help celebrate the end of EID-Ul-Fitr.

Relatives and families came together to enjoy their first daylight meal in a month.

Besides lots of tasty Indian dishes, new clothes are worn, and rather than getting presents from their parents, children are given pocket money to spend at the shops – where they can go to buy their own Eid gifts!

There are three different types of Eid festivals celebrated in the Islamic faith.

The first in the Muslim calendar is Eid-Milad that involves celebrating prophet Mohammad’s birthday.

A group photograph of injured Punjabi-Muslim British-Indian Army Soldiers resting at the Brighton Royal Pavilion Hospital.

A group photograph of injured Punjabi-Muslim British-Indian Army Soldiers resting at the Brighton Royal Pavilion Hospital.

The second one is Eid-Ul-Fitr – marking the end of Ramadhan and the third is Eid-Ul-Adha which commemorates Abraham’s willingness to please the Lord God by getting ready to sacrifice his son.

Eid-Ul-Fitr is celebrated immediately after the month of Ramadhan is over. It is a festival of thanksgiving for Muslims who celebrate completing their thirty days of fasting by attending morning prayers at the Mosque, followed by visits to the homes of families and friends.

As usual, some local Mosques got their Maddrassah pupils ready this year for the festival by organising Eid-Ul-Fitr parties.

Britain’s distinguished senior Muslim Scholar, Professor Shaiykh Allama Moalana Shahid Raza Naeemi (OBE), said: “Eid-Ul-Fitr festivities will take place in this very interesting year that marks the 100th anniversary of the Armistice.

A colour photograph of a paralysed British-Indian Army Muslim soldier (being treated in Britain) who is having an EID letter written to his family in India.

A colour photograph of a paralysed British-Indian Army Muslim soldier (being treated in Britain) who is having an EID letter written to his family in India.

“We need to use this year’s festival of Eid-Ul-Fitr to remember all those thousands of forgotten soldiers from the old British-Indian Army who were injured or killed during the First World War. They fought to create a better society for everyone.

“Let’s now use the festival of Eid-Ul-Fitr to help build a caring, cohesive society by engaging with our young generation.

“This is my Eid message for all our Muslim families living across the Heavy Woollen District.”