Aston Martin Valhalla revealed as 937bhp V8 hybrid hypercar

£600k mid-engined monster joins Valkyrie in marque’s wave of electrificed models

Monday, 19th July 2021, 10:32 am
Aston Martin Valhalla

Say hello to the Aston Martin Valhalla - a brand new hybrid hypercar set to sit below the astonishing Valkyrie and take on the likes of the Ferrari SF90 Stradale.

As the marque’s first mid-engined road car and first hybrid, Aston Martin says the Valhalla represents a critical step in its plans to create a range of driver-focused cars that embrace the electrification of motoring.

At its heart sits a twin-turbocharged 4.0-litre V8 sourced, like that in the DB11, from AMG. The flat-plane crank engine is said to be the most responsive and advanced unit ever used in an Aston Martin and produces 740bhp, which is transmitted to the road via an eight-speed twin-clutch auto transmission. Supplementing that are two electric motors - one mounted on each axle - with a combined output of 201bhp for a usable total of 937bhp.

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Aston Martin Valhalla

Aston Martin says this eye-opening power is enough to give the Vahalla a 0-62mph time of just 2.5 seconds and a top speed of 217mph.

Like its most obvious rival, the Ferrari SF90, the Vahalla uses just its front electric motor in EV mode, offering speeds of up to 80mph and a range of a meagre nine miles. The electric drive is also used for reversing, saving weight by removing the need for a physical reverse gear in the auto transmission.

Aston Martin rejoined F1 this year and the talk around the Valhalla’s reveal is full of references to how the road car has been inspired by, and makes use of, F1 technology, including in the development of the hybrid system.

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Aston Martin Valhalla

The car is built around a carbon fibre tub and most of the bodywork is also made from the lightweight material, with a stated aim to have a dry weight of 1,550kg for an “unrivalled” power-to-weight ratio.

The bodywork has been sculpted to aid active aero elements fitted to the front and rear of the car, including a relatively subtle rear wing. Aston Martin says the combination of active surfaces and huge Venturi tunnels under the car, developed using F1 tech, will generate 600kg of downforce at 150mph.

Also borrowed from F1 is the Vahalla’s front pushrod suspension with inboard springs and dampers which combines with a multilink rear setup. An adaptive control system will allow drivers to tune the suspension to the conditions, ranging from slamming the car for maximum downforce on track to lifting the nose to overcome speed bumps.

Braking is by wire, with electronics controlling the operation of the carbon ceramic units tucked behind 20-inch front and 21-inch rear wheels.

Aston Martin Valhalla

Design-wise, Aston Martin says the underfloor aero has allowed it to create a “memorable mid-engined shape” that is still “unmistakably Aston Martin”. There’s certainly no mistaking the broad, slatted grille that leads the slippery, smooth Valhalla’s shape. Dihedral doors, a massive roof-mounted air scoop for the engine and twin exhausts which erupt upwards just behind the engine add to the sense of drama around the Valhalla.

The interior design is being kept under wraps for now but Aston Martin has confirmed that the two-seater will offer more space than the Valkyrie but with a pared back cockpit design focused on the driver. including fixed seats with an adjustable pedal box.

The Valhalla is described as a supercar by Aston Martin and slots into the range beneath the £2.5m Valkyrie and above an expected new Vanquish. However, with nearly 1,000bhp and a predicted price of around £600,000 we’d say that puts it firmly in hypercar territory

Aston Martin’s CEO, Tobias Moers commented: “Preserving the essence of an exceptional concept car is vital when meeting the challenge of bringing it into production. With Valhalla not only have we stayed true to our commitment to build a world-beating supercar, but we have exceeded our original aims. The result is a pure driving machine - one which exists right at the cutting edge of performance and technology yet allows the driver to feel the emotion and thrill of complete connection and control.”