Hygiene fine for takeaway

An environmental health officer from Kirklees Council found a box containing chicken had been left on top of loose raw chicken when he inspected Perfect Fried Chicken in Dewsbury in January this year.
An environmental health officer from Kirklees Council found a box containing chicken had been left on top of loose raw chicken when he inspected Perfect Fried Chicken in Dewsbury in January this year.
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A TAKEAWAY owner must pay more than £10,000 after admitting food hygiene offences.

An environmental health officer found a box of raw chicken had been left on top of loose raw chicken when he inspected Perfect Fried Chicken in Dewsbury earlier this year.

He found some staff had not been trained in food hygiene and were working unsupervised.

But owner Noorjahan Begum said she had done all she could to get staff trained and maintain standards.

Batley and Dewsbury Magistrates heard on Tuesday how James Kaye visited the premises in Northgate on January 6.

Sobia Ahmed, prosecuting for Kirklees Council, said the visit was to check Ms Begum was following an order made last October to get health and safety certificates for her staff.

But Mr Kaye found staff were still not trained and a box, pictured, had been left on a pile of raw chicken.

Ms Begum admitted staff still did not have food hygiene certificates, but said she had had problems finding centres that her staff could attend.

In court, she said she could not enrol staff on courses when she was first ordered to do so because local training centres were about to close for Christmas.

She said many of her staff were not computer literate enough to complete online courses and struggled with English.

She added that due to the nature of her business, many staff did not stay long enough to complete the qualifications.

Miss Ahmed said environmental health officers had been involved with Perfect Fried Chicken since 2004.

Musa Patel, mitigating, said the box of raw chicken had been left on top of the open raw chicken by a member of staff who panicked when environmental health officers arrived.

Sentencing, magistrate Johanna Broadbent, said: “We have taken note of the long history of the of involvement of the local authority and the cavalier approach which you have taken to the various improvement notices you have been given.”

Ms Begum admitted two food hygiene offences and one of failing to comply with an improvement notice. She was fined £9,000 and must pay £1,200 costs and a £15 victim surcharge. Three other food hygiene charges were dropped. She told the Reporter she has lodged an appeal against her sentence.