Tumour patient Bailey Coppack back from life-changing treatment in America

LIFE-CHANGING: Bailey Coppack gets ready for her last day at the ProCure Proton Therapy Centre in Oklahoma where she underwent treatment to stop her brain tumour growing.
LIFE-CHANGING: Bailey Coppack gets ready for her last day at the ProCure Proton Therapy Centre in Oklahoma where she underwent treatment to stop her brain tumour growing.
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A SCHOOLGIRL has been settling back into life at home after a life-changing trip to America.

Bailey Coppack was back in lessons at Castle Hall Academy just hours after returning from Oklahoma, where she was being treated for a brain tumour.

The 13-year-old arrived home on Tuesday, but instead of spending the last few days of the school year recovering from her treatment, she went back to school on Wednesday.

Mum Lisa said: “She has come back from her treatment and gone straight back to it.

“I wouldn’t expect anything less from Bailey.”

Bailey and her family went to the ProCure Proton Therapy Centre in Oklahoma in May.

It was hoped that the groundbreaking treatment she would receive there would stop a brain tumour that was discovered in 2008 from growing any bigger.

The treatment involved Bailey making daily trips to the hospital where her tumour was exposed to a controlled level of radiation.

“The staff at the ProCure centre made us feel so welcome,” Ms Coppack, of Overhall Road, Mirfield, said.

The centre treats many patients from the UK and Bailey’s family made lots of new friends.

When not undergoing treatment, Bailey was free to make the most of her time in Oklahoma and took a trip to Texas for her birthday in June.

As a result of the treatment, Bailey has lost her hair in some places, but so far there have not been any other side effects.

Next week, Bailey will have a check-up at St James’s hospital in Leeds, then an MRI scan at Leeds General Infirmary in four months time will see what difference the treatment has made.

“Over in Oklahoma they were really, really positive that it will work,” Mrs Coppack said.

The treatment was funded by the NHS, which also paid for flights and accommodation for Bailey and her parents.

Thousands of pounds raised by the local community helped cover their other expenses and meant that Bailey’s sister Ellie, half-brother Jamie and stepfather Graham Ellis could also join her in Oklahoma to lend their support.